Collection of Prints and Drawings

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Production People
Giulio Bonasone (Print made by)artist bio
Bonasone, Giulio (di Antonio)
b Bologna, c. 1510; d Bologna, after 1576
Title / Description
Tantalus Speaking to Juno, Goddes of Childbirth, print 4 from a series of 22 prints of the Loves, Rages and Jealousies of Juno
 
Date
c. 1568
 
Technique
engraving, etching
Material
paper
Dimensions
133 x 102 mm (platemark)
Inscriptions
Signed: 'I Bonasone//inuentor' and inscribed: 'Ecco misero Tantalo il peccato/Che puote in te che per uoler diuino/E di fame e di sete ognor meschino/Ten muori e l'acqua e l'pomo hai sempre a lato'
State
only state
 
Watermark
no
Provenance
Nikolaus Esterházy (Lugt 1966)
 
References
Bartsch XV.144.116 info
Adam Bartsch, Le peintre-graveur, vols. 21, Vienna 1803-21

Massari 1983, no. 197 (only state) info
Stefania Massari, Giulio Bonasone, exhibition catalogue, 2 vols., Rome, Istituto Nazionale per la Grafica 1983

Cirillo Archer in TIB 1995, 2803.116 (only state) info
Madeline Cirillo Archer, Italian Masters of the Sixteenth Century, The Illustrated Bartsch, vol. 28, Part 1 (Commentary), New York 1995
 
Comment
Giulio Bonasone's own claim on the prints indicates they are of his own invention. However, according to Cirillo Archer in TIB, a variety of influences can be identified, synthesized into Bonasone's style: the borders of Fontainebleau school prints, especially those by Jean Mignon, and quotations from Antonio Correggio, Marcantonio Raimondi and Giulio Romano. Preliminary drawings for the etched borders of nine of the prints survive in Hamburg. According to Frederick G. Schab in his review of Massari's book in Print Quarterly 2 (1985), p. 59, the quality of the engravings in this series indicates that the translation of Bonasone's drawings was done by an assistant of a poor quality. The iconography of the prints is unusual, regarding both the individual stories and the overall concept. The scenes and the verses are moralized interpretations of classical mythology and carry implicit connections to the Protestant Reformation and the Counter-Reformation.The series is connected to the humanist circle at the Accademia Bocchiana, Bologna and with the religious ideas of Cardinal Gabriele Paleotti. The verses were possibly composed by Bonasone himself.
 
Inventory Number
6448
 
Classification
Prints: Italian: 16th century: Unmounted
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