Collection of Prints and Drawings

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Production People
Francesco Rosselli (Print made by)artist bio
Rosselli, Francesco
b Florence, 1448; d Florence, before 1513
Title / Description
The Agony in the Garden, from the series of fifteen prints representing the Life of the Virgin and Christ
 
Date
c. 1485-1490
 
Technique
engraving
Material
paper
Dimensions
226 x 158 mm (sheet, trimmed)
Inscriptions
no
State
first state of three
 
Watermark
no
Provenance
Nikolaus Esterházy (Lugt 1966)
 
References
Hind I, p. 123, no. B.I.6-II info
Arthur Mayger Hind, Early Italian Engraving: A Critical Catalogue with Complete Reproduction of All the Prints Described, vols. 1-4 (part 1, Florentine Engravings and Anonymous Prints of Other Schools), London 1938; vols. 5-7 (part 2, Known Masters Other Than Florentines, Monogrammists and Anonymous), London 1948

Passavant V.51-51,1-15 (as a follower of Filippo Lippi) info
Johann David Passavant, Le peintre-graveur, 6 vols., Leipzig 1860-64

Bartsch XIII.259.11 (as Nicoletto da Modena) info
Adam Bartsch, Le peintre-graveur, vols. 21, Vienna 1803-21

Levenson, Oberhuber, and Sheehan 1973, pp. 47-59 info
Jay A. Levenson, Konrad Oberhuber, and Jacquelyn L. Sheehan, Early Italian Engravings from the National Gallery of Art, exhibition catalogue, Washington, National Gallery of Art 1973

Cirillo Archer 1988, (the whole series as attributed to
Francesco Rosselli) info
Madeleine Cirillo Archer, 'The Dating of a Florentine Life of the Virgin and Christ', Print Quarterly 5 (1988), pp. 395-402.

Zucker in TIB 1994, 2404.006.S1 (as Francesco Rosselli,
first state of three) info
Mark J. Zucker, Early Italian Masters, The Illustrated Bartsch, vol. 24, Part 2 (Commentary), New York 1994
 
Comment
Although the compositions of the series reflect strong influences of Benozzo Gozzoli, Alesso Baldovinetti, Filippo Lippi, and Antonio Pollaiuolo, it seems plausible that the designs were created by Francesco Rosselli himself. The subjects of the fifteen broad manner engravings coincide with the Mysteries of the Rosary, as H. Brockhaus recognized in 1909. According to Cirillo Archer 1988, while no other mystery series survives from this period in Tuscany, there is historical evidence that others were executed.
 
Inventory Number
5075
 
Classification
Prints: Italian: 15th century: Mounted I
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